Articles tagged with: archaeology

Get your walking boots on!

on Friday, 02 May 2014. Posted in Archaeology

The Archaeology Team are preparing again to organise some events to celebrate the annual Festival of British Archaeology. Due to poplar demand, this year the team are organising three weekend archaeological walks to different areas of archaeological interest across Wiltshire.

Sunday 13th July:  guided walk to the Easton Grey Roman settlement near Malmesbury with Melanie Pomeroy-Kellinger and Clare King

Sunday 20th July: guided walk in the Stonehenge landscape with Rachel Foster and Tom Sunley (please note this walk not include a visit to the visitor centre and stone circle which can be done separately)

Saturday 26th July: guided walk to Knapp Hill, Adam’s Grave in the Vale of Pewsey with Faye Glover and Emma Whitcombe.

The walks will include some of Wiltshire’s best known prehistoric monuments in the Stonehenge landscape, including Woodhenge, Durrington Walls and the Stonehenge Avenue. The walk in the Pewsey Vale will include the magnificent views from Adam’s Grave Neolithic Long Barrow and Knap Hill. The walk at Easton Grey will focus on the Roman remains in North Wiltshire and the Cotswolds and will include a walk along the Fosse Way Roman Road.

Wiltshire and Swindon's Historic Landscape

on Tuesday, 11 March 2014. Posted in Archaeology

In April 2012 the Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Landscape Characterisation (HLC) Project was launched. The intention of the project was to study the whole county and to identify the historic and archaeological processes which have influenced the modern landscape.

This work should help in understanding the evolution of the settlements and countryside and to identify what we can see that is typical and what is unusual.

 Now, two years into the project, real progress is being made in analysing the areas where we live, work and visit within Wiltshire. Currently, an area of c.194,000 ha (1940 km2) has been characterised. This includes many of the well-known urban and rural landscapes that we all know and enjoy – such as Salisbury Plain and Swindon. Data exists for many of the parishes, and the coverage is expanding all the time!

 

A trip to Stonehenge Visitor Centre

on Tuesday, 18 February 2014. Posted in Archaeology

The Conservation and Museums Advisory Service were lucky enough to be given a tour around the new Stonehenge Visitor Centre last week.

Newly opened by English Heritage at the end of last year the centre transforms the experience of visiting Stonehenge. The route to the stones is now a brisk walk or a rather warmer ride in the fleet of Land Rover trains. This keeps the car park away from the monument itself, restoring the stones more to their setting within the landscape.

Being newly opened the site is still developing – work had just started on the construction of replica Neolithic roundhouses on the day we visited.

For me one of the most exciting things about visiting and the biggest change from the previous experience is that for the first time you can see objects found at the site on display.

The vast majority of the finds that have been discovered in the Stonehenge landscape over the years are now held by the Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum and the Wiltshire Museum in Devizes. Working in partnership, the two museums have loaned some of these artefacts to English Heritage for display, allowing the visitor centre to give a good feel for how people over the centuries made and used Stonehenge.

Some of the conservation work to get these objects ready for display was done by my conservator colleagues back in Chippenham, who were really pleased to be able to see their finished work on show.

If you are able, I would thoroughly recommend a trip to Stonehenge, Salisbury and Devizes. There is no better way to get up close to the artefacts of Neolithic and Bronze Age Wiltshire.

Tim Burge, Museums Officer

A New Future for Stonehenge

on Monday, 23 December 2013. Posted in Archaeology

At 2 PM on Wednesday 18th December a brand new and much needed visitor centre for Stonehenge opened its door to the public. The £27 million building was completed and funded by English Heritage with financial support from the Heritage Lottery Fund. This marks the culmination of decades of work and several plans and schemes to provide a modern and world class visitor centre for this much-visited site.

The new centre is located 2 km west of Stonehenge at Airman’s Corner, between Amesbury and Shrewton. As well as providing the expected array of visitor necessities (parking, shop, restaurant, toilets) the building incorporates an impressive exhibition and interpretation facility. For the first time visitors can read and see the full story of the site and how it has been investigated just prior to seeing Stonehenge. The exhibition includes some of the real objects found during the archaeological excavations, helping to bring the interpretation of the site to life. After visiting the exhibition, visitors have the option of walking to Stonehenge, taking in many other prehistoric monuments on the way, or taking the land train there and back. This has all been made possible by the closure of the A344 which until recently allowed vehicles to drive close to Stonehenge. The removal of this road has greatly enhanced the setting and ambiance of the site.

Prehistoric Wiltshire Galleries

on Friday, 29 November 2013. Posted in Museums

I was delighted to be amongst over 200 people in Devizes on Monday to celebrate the official opening of the new Prehistoric Wiltshire galleries at the Wiltshire Museum.

The culmination of years of planning, fundraising and hard graft by staff and volunteers has allowed the museum to put together a suite of galleries that any museum would be proud of.

Exploring the archaeology of Wiltshire and Swindon Online

on Tuesday, 29 October 2013. Posted in Archaeology

We get many enquiries about archaeological sites in Wiltshire and Swindon, from people interested in features that they have seen whilst walking, from local history societies, and from academic researchers, for example. We can search the Wiltshire and Swindon Historic Environment Record (WSHER) to pull out the details for these enquiries. The WSHER records archaeological and historic features in a database and on digital mapping, and includes sites such as hillforts, deserted settlements, pillboxes and watermills.

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