Articles tagged with: Vale of Pewsey

Barbury Castle: Fine Views and Fortifications

on Monday, 31 July 2017. Posted in Archaeology, Wiltshire Places

Iron Age hillforts must be one of the most visited types of archaeological sites in the country.  Recently I have been up to Barbury Castle a couple of times and have been reminded how impressive and commanding this site is, not just because of its massive ramparts, but also its good state of preservation and all of the other archaeological features you can see from here.  It is one of the most impressive of the 35 hillforts we have in the Wiltshire and Swindon area, with panoramic views that take in the Marlborough Downs and the Vale of Pewsey.

Barbury Castle from north west. Aerial photo from 1991. Wiltshire Council

Barbury is located between Wroughton and Swindon and the County boundary, as well as parish boundaries, run through the middle of the hillfort.  The hillfort was built in the Iron Age, probably around 700 BC and is likely to have been continuously used until the Roman invasion in the mid 1st century AD.  It was one of a string of hillforts built close to the line of the Ridgeway, considered to be an ancient long distance routeway.  Three other hillforts, Liddington, Uffington and Martinsell are all intervisible with Barbury.  It is the most developed and most impressive of the Ridgeway hillforts, having double ramparts on the south side and triple on the north side (possibly an unfinished circuit).  In places the banks or ramparts stand over 3 metres in height even now and in the Iron Age would have been topped with wooden palisades and defensive towers.  Located at 262 metres above sea level Barbury was built on the highest point of the local area, a beneficial defensive position with commanding views of the landscapes below.

The ramparts at Barbury enclose an area of about 5 hectares and there were two original entrances that survive today at the east and west sides.  Unfortunately there has been little modern archaeological investigation to tell us details of the lives lived at Barbury.  However, the results of a geophysical survey carried out by English Heritage in 1998 indicate that the interior is littered with hundreds of pits (probably for grain storage) and other features, some of which are the remains of huts or roundhouses.

The interior of the hillfort as well as the ramparts have suffered some damage in the 1940s from the activities of American troops and the Home Guard who were based at the nearby Wroughton Airfield during the war and used Barbury as a training ground.  The original hillfort entrances were unfortunately widened by American troops in order to get their trucks into the interior.  Fortunately, we have a measured survey drawn in 1884 by General Augustus Pitt Rivers, the first ever Inspector of Ancient Monuments, to show how they would have been.

Get your walking boots on!

on Friday, 02 May 2014. Posted in Archaeology

The Archaeology Team are preparing again to organise some events to celebrate the annual Festival of British Archaeology. Due to poplar demand, this year the team are organising three weekend archaeological walks to different areas of archaeological interest across Wiltshire.

Sunday 13th July:  guided walk to the Easton Grey Roman settlement near Malmesbury with Melanie Pomeroy-Kellinger and Clare King

Sunday 20th July: guided walk in the Stonehenge landscape with Rachel Foster and Tom Sunley (please note this walk not include a visit to the visitor centre and stone circle which can be done separately)

Saturday 26th July: guided walk to Knapp Hill, Adam’s Grave in the Vale of Pewsey with Faye Glover and Emma Whitcombe.

The walks will include some of Wiltshire’s best known prehistoric monuments in the Stonehenge landscape, including Woodhenge, Durrington Walls and the Stonehenge Avenue. The walk in the Pewsey Vale will include the magnificent views from Adam’s Grave Neolithic Long Barrow and Knap Hill. The walk at Easton Grey will focus on the Roman remains in North Wiltshire and the Cotswolds and will include a walk along the Fosse Way Roman Road.

Journey to Pewsey

on Wednesday, 09 April 2014. Posted in Museums

As Museum Documentation Assistant, I am currently spending a great deal of my time working with our chosen collections management database, MODES.


Recently the History Centre and some of our Wiltshire museums have upgraded their software to the new and innovative Modes Complete system and I have been helping them in this process. One of the nicest things about the upgrade is the chance for me to go and visit the various museums and their committed volunteers.


As a non driver living in Corsham, I have explored the various transport opportunities to get me into the Wiltshire countryside and as the county is so big and our museums spaced so widely, this has been challenging!

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