Articles tagged with: National Archives

The Manorial Document Register for Wiltshire and Swindon goes Live!

on Monday, 18 July 2016. Posted in Archives, Wiltshire People, Wiltshire Places

On Tuesday 12 July the new Wiltshire and Swindon Manorial Documents Register went live on The National Archives Discovery website

Wiltshire joins other counties on Discovery in providing up-to-date information on where the county’s manorial records are kept. These are key historical sources on the lives of our ancestors for family and local historians, for planning and rights of way enquiries and for students and scholars of all ages. Most, but not all, of Wiltshire’s manorial records are kept at Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre, but the online Manorial Documents Register within Discovery makes it possible to search one database for the County’s records held in all British and overseas archives.

The revision and online publication of the Wiltshire and Swindon MDR has been made possible by generous grants from The National Archives and the Federation of Family History Societies. Claire Skinner, principal archivist, has managed the project and the work has been done by project officer Dr Virginia Bainbridge and a team of 20 volunteers, assisted by Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre staff. The launch took place at a buffet lunch to thank all the volunteers!

Volunteers for the Manorial Documents Register join Claire Skinner of WSHC and Sarah Charlton of the TNA in celebrating the launch of the MDR, with project officer Virginia Bainbridge (fourth from the right in the back row)

In 1086, Domesday Book recorded information on all the landed estates of England. Many of these estates developed into the manors which controlled their tenants’ lives for over eight more centuries. Manorial officials began writing records in the decades around 1200 when record-keeping became more common.

Transforming Archives: ARA Audience Engagement

on Tuesday, 24 May 2016. Posted in Archives

As part of my year-long ‘Transforming Archives’ traineeship I have a training (and separate travel) budget from The National Archives (with funding from HLF). This budget gives me the chance to not only scout out learning and development opportunities that I wouldn’t normally have access to, but also lets me attend them for free – which is absolutely brilliant really. Obviously there are limitations, we can’t go jetting off around the world for a lecture, or get them to pay for a Masters course. I have however been to quite a few places around the UK; I’m off to Glasgow for the Copyright and Cultural Memory Conference next month, for example.

Anyhow, on 18th March 2016, a perfect training event popped up for me to attend for a mere £35 of my training budget (plus my travel and a hotel for a night). The Eastern and London Regions of the Archives and Records Association (ARA) held some core training in, ‘Audience Engagement: Strategies and Practices’, at the central library, Cambridge. After a warm welcome from the ARA Training Officers Diane Hodgson and Anne Jensen, it was straight into six different talks from people with a wide range of experience in the field.

First up was ARA’s Head of Public Affairs, Jon Elliot, talking about the Explore Your Archive Campaign and how it can be used to project the archive profession and the value of what archives hold and do. Explore Your Archive is a joint campaign between the National Archives and ARA that encourages archives across the UK to host events and projects that highlight their service. Using marketing materials to create a cohesive campaign, the focus is on a week-long celebration of archives in November (though events can also be held throughout the year). Jon believes the campaign has been a success so far, but that improvements do need to be made, which they are aiming to implement over the next 3 year phase.

Next was a thorough and very informative talk from National Archives Outreach Officer, Sandra Shakespeare. Sandra pointed out the importance of actually evaluating your evaluations. There’s no point collecting lots of data on visitors if you don’t actually review that data and make use of it to shape your engagement plans. Sandra explained the many benefits of creative approaches to audience engagement, including working in partnerships to deliver projects, which can give you an opportunity to navigate around boundaries and take risks. One point that really stuck with me was that you need to empower people, start conversations and really build relationships, and then people will respond if they feel that they are valued and their opinions matter.

Brush up on your Latin!

on Tuesday, 23 February 2016. Posted in Archives

Which is the odd one out of this group of words?

‘grateful’, ‘kilogram’, ‘millennium’, ‘triangle’, ‘umbrella’

The answer is ‘kilogram’ – this word derives from the Greek ‘kilo’, meaning one thousand, plus the French word ‘gramme’. All the other words originate in Latin. Whether we are aware of it or not, Latin permeates the English language, and there are often English words which can help us when learning Latin. For example we talk about ‘paternal pride’ or ‘maternal affection’ – these come straight from the Latin ‘pater’, meaning ‘father’, and ‘mater’ meaning ‘mother’. So far, so good. But why would you choose to learn Latin, you might say? Unless you want to be a botanist, or a doctor, what possible use can it be? Well, as an archivist it is actually very helpful. What many people do not realise is that until as late as 1733, Latin was the language of the law in England and Wales. There is an exception to this – the English Commonwealth (1653-1659) – when English became the official language of the state for a brief period – but apart from this, you can expect to encounter Latin in records created for legal purposes.

 

A judge adjudicating on a neighbourhood dispute. Source: British Library public domain images Add MSS 23144 ff4-6 

Transforming Archives and Developing Community

on Monday, 28 September 2015. Posted in Archives

For the past year I have been based at the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre for my National Archives 'Transforming Archives' traineeship where I have been developing a community archive for the village of Lacock. It has been a fantastic opportunity to gain new skills and develop existing ones. These have included using Joomla (website software), training and managing volunteers, arranging events, advertising, interviewing residents, project management skills, amid many others. For me, the most exciting part of my traineeship was meeting the local residents of Lacock and others in the surrounding areas.   The enthusiasm they held for their village, history and community was startling and was something that I have never experienced in the places that I have lived. The friendliness and willingness to welcome myself and my volunteers into their homes to share their memories, stories and photographs of Lacock was wonderful. It has been a privilege to be able to learn more about this small and close community, over the last year, which is sadly under threat from the continuing rise of tourism and the demands that this entails.

The Lacock Community Archive has collected fifty-two oral history interviews from those within Lacock and the surrounding areas concerning evacuees, American soldiers, Lacock School, fetes and fairs or Manor Farm (located in the village) which no longer exists. Memories have ranged from dressing up as a swine herdsman son at the Lacock Pageant of 1932 to delivering papers to the Abbey.   The interviewees have ranged from teenagers in the village to those who have lived there for their entire lives and whose family goes back generations within the village. In addition to this, over five hundred copies of various photographs and documents have been collected from the community and uploaded to the Lacock website for everybody to view. These include photographs of sport teams, weddings, the old Working Men's Club and events such as the millennium procession. Hopefully, both the oral history interviews and collection of photographs will prove to be a useful historical resource and will continue being a means to share information about the village.  

Goodies and Baddies: Crime and Punishment in the Archives

on Tuesday, 05 May 2015. Posted in Archives, Crime

Crime and punishment is always a popular topic for research in the archives, and can reveal some interesting insights into life in the past. For more detail about the kinds of sources available and what they can tell you, see our guidance: http://www.wshc.eu/next-steps-in-family-history.html#prisoners

Murder and felony:

‘Wiltshire Murders’ by Nicola Sly (AAA.343) in our local studies collection describes an unpleasant case of the murder of Judith Pearce. It tells of Edward Buckland, a gypsy who had been begging and odd-jobbing around the area of Seagry for many years. Judith Pearce had been known to give him the odd crust, but one evening, refused his request to come into her cottage to warm himself by the fire. Later that evening the thatched roof of Judith’s cottage caught fire. The fire was extinguished without too much damage, but it was widely believed to have been deliberately started by Buckland, who swiftly left the area.

Later in the year, Judith and her grand-daughter Elizabeth were woken by the sounds of someone trying to enter the cottage. They barred the kitchen door, but the intruder attempted to break through with a hatchet. Judith and Elizabeth succeeded in breaking through the lathe wall of the cottage into the garden, but were pursued by the assailant. Elizabeth managed to escape and ran to relatives for help. Sadly by the time they returned Judith Pearce was dead. Nothing from the house was stolen, suggesting it was likely to be a personal grudge.

Edward Buckland, having recently returned to the area, was apprehended close to the scene the following morning, tried at the Lent Assizes in Salisbury, 1821 where he was found guilty and sentenced to death.

‘I am damned if I killed the old woman’

Records of Assize trials are held at the National Archives in Kew, and Buckland does not appear in the calendar of prisoner. However, the fact of his trial is recorded in the criminal register, viewable on Ancestry, along with the guilty verdict.

The Devizes and Wiltshire Gazette March 22nd 1821 provides a detailed account of the trial and account of the murder.

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