Articles tagged with: Devizes and Wiltshire Gazette

Deadly Game: death of a poacher at Red Lodge Farm in Braydon

on Monday, 20 November 2017. Posted in Architecture, Wiltshire People, Wiltshire Places

Wiltshire Buildings Record was recently asked to look at Red Lodge Farmhouse, Braydon. This was a farm created in the mid-17th century out of the royal forest of Braydon, which had formerly been a royal hunting ground. The house is of great interest and reflects changing ownership over time until the 20th century, as does almost every house we look at. This time, however, it was a very human tragedy that took our attention.

Andrews and Dury 1773 map

By sheer coincidence I was on my way there and had called into another farm at Brinkworth nearby. When I mentioned my destination, the farmer exclaimed that his great, great uncle, Hezekiah Matthews, had been killed as a poacher at Red Lodge in 1882, and gave me a transcript of the poor man’s inquest.

Hezekiah Matthews had been one of a group of poachers, all cousins from Brinkworth, who were looking to bag something for the pot on the night of 27th December 1882. Because of previous incidents, a watching party consisting of the Neeld Estate head keeper, William Collins, Henry Reeves, Henry John Reeves, Thomas Reeves, and three others ambushed them, and after a struggle, apprehended them. Unfortunately, two of the keeper’s party were accidentally shot, and Hezekiah Matthews received a blow to the head. They were all taken off to Red Lodge Farmhouse to await the doctor and the police, who were coming from Purton.

Goodies and Baddies: Crime and Punishment in the Archives

on Tuesday, 05 May 2015. Posted in Archives, Crime

Crime and punishment is always a popular topic for research in the archives, and can reveal some interesting insights into life in the past. For more detail about the kinds of sources available and what they can tell you, see our guidance: http://www.wshc.eu/next-steps-in-family-history.html#prisoners

Murder and felony:

‘Wiltshire Murders’ by Nicola Sly (AAA.343) in our local studies collection describes an unpleasant case of the murder of Judith Pearce. It tells of Edward Buckland, a gypsy who had been begging and odd-jobbing around the area of Seagry for many years. Judith Pearce had been known to give him the odd crust, but one evening, refused his request to come into her cottage to warm himself by the fire. Later that evening the thatched roof of Judith’s cottage caught fire. The fire was extinguished without too much damage, but it was widely believed to have been deliberately started by Buckland, who swiftly left the area.

Later in the year, Judith and her grand-daughter Elizabeth were woken by the sounds of someone trying to enter the cottage. They barred the kitchen door, but the intruder attempted to break through with a hatchet. Judith and Elizabeth succeeded in breaking through the lathe wall of the cottage into the garden, but were pursued by the assailant. Elizabeth managed to escape and ran to relatives for help. Sadly by the time they returned Judith Pearce was dead. Nothing from the house was stolen, suggesting it was likely to be a personal grudge.

Edward Buckland, having recently returned to the area, was apprehended close to the scene the following morning, tried at the Lent Assizes in Salisbury, 1821 where he was found guilty and sentenced to death.

‘I am damned if I killed the old woman’

Records of Assize trials are held at the National Archives in Kew, and Buckland does not appear in the calendar of prisoner. However, the fact of his trial is recorded in the criminal register, viewable on Ancestry, along with the guilty verdict.

The Devizes and Wiltshire Gazette March 22nd 1821 provides a detailed account of the trial and account of the murder.

What Delights a Christmas Past can have in Store!

on Tuesday, 02 December 2014. Posted in Seasons

After the very recent experience of Black Friday it’s pleasant to remember Christmas shopping of 50 or 60 years ago. Every town in Wiltshire had at least one toy shop and many village shops bought in toys especially for Christmas. For children the short daylight hours of November and December were brightened by the brightly lit windows of the toy and grocery shops. Few vehicle lights and less strident street lighting made these into bright beacons attracting children as moths to a flame. The prices in this Wiltshire shop window may make you long for the days when inflation meant pumping up your bike tyres and it’s useful to look at relative prices in past decades.

Old newspapers are a great source for this, particularly in the weeks leading up to Christmas. Since the beginning of the 20th century shops and businesses have been advertising their seasonal offerings in the pages of local newspapers. Have a look in the Salisbury Journal, Devizes and Wiltshire Gazette, and the Wiltshire Times and you will find what earlier generations bought at this time of year and how much it cost them. You’ll find all our Wiltshire newspapers, dating back to 1736, in the Wiltshire & Swindon History Centre in Chippenham. On a cold, grey winter day you can lose yourself in the past whilst sitting at one of our recently refurbished microfilm readers scrolling through pages of newsprint. You'll just need to give us a call on 01249 705500 to book a reader before you make your journey into a Wiltshire Christmas past.

Michael Marshman
County Local Studies Librarian

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