Architecture

‘A hotbed of Emms’ the story of a Bratton House

on Tuesday, 10 March 2015. Posted in Architecture

We were asked to investigate a small cottage in Lower Road, Bratton a little while ago by the descendant of the original builder. It’s not often this happens, and we were rather nervous about reporting on the documentary history when the protagonists are so intimately connected to the client; the odd murder and nefarious activity has not been unknown…

It appears that the cottage built by Benjamin Emm started as two dwellings. His will of 1803 clearly stated that the house was occupied by his son James and also John Balsh which would account for the two front doors, one now blocked. Benjamin was an enterprising individual who made one small cottage pay its way!

Rare Interiors: Surviving Polychrome Wall-Paintings in Wiltshire

on Tuesday, 23 December 2014. Posted in Architecture

In October we were lucky enough to have a visit from Dr Andrea Kirkham, a specialist conservator of wall paintings and polychrome decoration. Andrea comes from Norwich and has made extensive study of wall and panel paintings in Suffolk. She is now gathering information for a wider-ranging study of the subject. We had heard Andrea lecture in Essex and invited her to look at some Wiltshire examples including 92, 93 & 94 Bradenstoke, Lyneham, where good remains of a polychrome scheme were recently discovered. It appears that most surviving secular wall-paintings date from 1500-1700, in Suffolk, and that certainly seems to be the case here in Wiltshire.

From bakehouses to bastions - being a volunteer with Wiltshire Building Record

on Tuesday, 07 October 2014. Posted in Architecture

I have been a volunteer with the Wiltshire Buildings Record for around twelve years.  Volunteering for me is a privilege and a pleasure.  I can choose to do it when it suits and it fits around my family.  The benefits have been many.  Life-long learning is very important to me.  Here, I am immersed in buildings archaeology, which is my passion.  My more experienced colleagues are generous with their time and knowledge.  They have given me the confidence to explore my interests more deeply.

There is no such thing as a typical week.  My work is varied.  Recently I have been busy letting people know about our annual Study Day “Dating Clues in Period Houses” which is on 8th November.   Yesterday morning I helped with the filing.  Afterwards we met with a paint conservator who is doing a PhD in 16-17th C painting schemes.  She came all the way from Suffolk to research what the WBR has found in Wiltshire, and to share her research findings with us.  It was fascinating and we will put our latest understanding into practice when recording buildings.  In the afternoon I went to Malmesbury where we made a record of the historic fabric in a small 19th C house.  This included what may be the remains of a lost bastion from the medieval town wall!

A Tribute to theTin Tabernacle

on Tuesday, 26 August 2014. Posted in Architecture, Traditions and Folklore

I came across a beautiful example of a tin tabernacle whilst exploring the area of Braydon recently, and I began wondering about the history of these most temporary of religious structures. Here’s what I discovered!

Britain saw a ‘revival’ of preaching in the 19th century through to the outbreak of WWI, with mass meetings attended by huge audiences. By the late 1850s churches were becoming overcrowded and the search was on for new buildings to use as places of worship. Non-conformists were not bound by the Anglican parish system and found it much easier to expand with new builds or altering existing buildings. Smith (2004) in his book Tin Tabernacles states that over 100,000 people were converted during this time, 80% of whom were non-conformist.

Welcome, the tin tabernacle!

Arsenic and Old Heytesbury

on Tuesday, 12 August 2014. Posted in Architecture

One of our latest jobs has been at the mill, Heytesbury, a gorgeous location with a clear mill-pond which the locals have traditionally used to cool down on a hot day. This mellow jumble of different brick and stone ranges, and varied roof-lines represents a site continually occupied from at least the early 17th century, and probably earlier. By the mid-C17 Heytesbury was owned by the a’Court family from Ivychurch near Salisbury. They continued to own much property here until the 1920s. During research into the family, an interesting case of poisoning came up.

A roof full of hammers

on Tuesday, 25 March 2014. Posted in Architecture

We were recently called to look at another old pub near Swindon which had closed down. Although it is always sad to hear about yet another community asset disappearing, it will hopefully go on in another guise as a family home.


This particular pub had a very innocent rendered face with mid-19th century windows which gave away nothing about the centuries of history inside. For me an old building is much like an onion. You can peel back the layers, the accretions of history, to the innermost core, or in this case the remains of a once-spectacular medieval hammer beam roof! What a surprise in a building hitherto thought to be 17th century date!

 

<<  1 2 [34 5  >>  

logos1

Accredited Archive Service